Natural killer cell activity in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma

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dc.contributor.advisor Young, M. Rita en_US
dc.contributor.author Wheeler, Elizabeth H. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:34:02Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:34:02Z
dc.date.created 1985 en_US
dc.date.issued 1985
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1985 .W43 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/183124
dc.description.abstract Natural killer (NK) cells are important in limiting tumor dissemination. The NK activity in C57B1/6 mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was monitored during tumor development. During the initial period of tumor growth, NK activity was enhanced. As tumor growth progressed, NK activity became suppressed. Depletion of macrophages from the spleen cells of tumor-bearing mice restored the NK cytotoxic response. Plasma prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations were measured by a radioimmunoassay and found to become elevated during the course of tumor growth. To determine whether the suppressed NK activity might have been a result of the elevated levels of PGE2, mice were treated with a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, indomethacin. Indomethacin treatment prevented the rise in plasma PGE2 concentrations and the suppression in NK activity. These results support the hypothesis that the suppression of NK activity in tumor bearers is mediated by PGE2 which might be produced by the host's suppressor macro-phages.
dc.format.extent vi, 28 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Killer cells. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Prostaglandins. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Macrophages. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Tumors -- Immunological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Mice -- Physiology. en_US
dc.title Natural killer cell activity in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/416656 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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