The roles that Indiana's association public relations practitioners perform and their involvement in the decision-making process

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dc.contributor.advisor McDonald, Becky A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Fryman, Jonathan Eric en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:35:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:35:35Z
dc.date.created 1991 en_US
dc.date.issued 1991
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1991 .F7 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184099
dc.description.abstract This thesis created a profile of Indiana's association public relations practitioners to see what type of roles they performed and how involved they were in the decision-making processes of their association.Because of the lack of research done on associations and their public relations practitioners, this descriptive study attempted to draw a profile of association public relations practitioners in Indiana that could be applied to different parts of the country or nationwide. The study also provided a foundation on which future research concerning associations can be based.Of the 129 associations in the population, 83 practitioners responded (64.3 response rate) to the phone survey. Information was gathered concerning the practitioner's job roles, their involvement in the decision-making process as well as demographic information about the associations and themselves.Broom and Smith's four public relations roles (expert prescriber, problem-solving process facilitator, communication facilitator and communication technician) were used to see if the practitioners primarily played any specific role in their association.The findings of the study indicated that public relations practitioners in associations don't play any one of the roles primarily but perform all four to varying degrees. All of the practitioners, both men and women, were equally involved in the decision-making processes of their associations. Previous studies in these topic areas indicated that men would primarily perform the role of expert prescriber and women would primarily perform the role of communication technician. Previous research also showed men would also be more involved in the decision-making process instead of women because they performed the necessary roles that allowed for that involvement. The results from the association survey show that association public relations practitioners are quite different from the norm. These differences can be attributed to several reasons. The lack of departmentalization and smaller staff sizes cause association public relations practitioners to wear more than one hat or perform various roles to varying degrees. It is because of the multiplicity of roles they perform that public relations practitioners are allowed to be more involved in the decision-making process as opposed to other practitioners who perform a certain role a majority of the time.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Journalism
dc.format.extent 41 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Public relations -- Indiana -- Societies, etc. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Public relations consultants. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Professional associations -- Indiana. en_US
dc.title The roles that Indiana's association public relations practitioners perform and their involvement in the decision-making process en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/834150 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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