The imposter phenomenon : locus of control, sex, level of education, generation status, age and race in a college population

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dc.contributor.advisor Bowman, Sharon L., 1960- en_US
dc.contributor.author Sauer, Eric M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:35:43Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:35:43Z
dc.date.created 1991 en_US
dc.date.issued 1991
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1991 .S2 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184182
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the impostor phenomenon (IP), an internal feeling of intellectual phoniness that was originally discovered in a group of highly successful women (Clance & Imes, 1979), by administering Harvey's IP Scale, Ratter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale (LOC) and a demographic questionnaire to 126 college students (73 women and 53 men). The goal of this study was to examine the relationships between the impostor phenomenon locus of control, gender, level of education, generation status, age and race. Results indicated a significant positive relationship between the impostor phenomenon and locus of control. No other constructs were found to be significantly related to the impostor phenomenon.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Counseling Psychology and Guidance Services
dc.format.extent 29 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Impostor phenomenon. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Self-perception. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Success -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College students -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title The imposter phenomenon : locus of control, sex, level of education, generation status, age and race in a college population en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/770940 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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