The influence of nonsmokers' argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness on compliance-gaining message selection in a smoking situation

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dc.contributor.advisor Flint, Lyle J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Smith, Ronda L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:35:56Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:35:56Z
dc.date.created 1992 en_US
dc.date.issued 1992
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1992 .S55 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184335
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the study investigated the influence of nonsmokers' argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness levels on their compliance-gaining message selection. Second, the study examined compliance-gaining usage on the basis of two additional independent variables -- agent and target gender. One hundred fifty-four participants completed instrumentation consisting of seven pages. The instrumentation included the Modified Argumentativeness Scale, the Verbal Aggressiveness Scale, the Nonsmoking Compliance-Gaining Scale, demographic and smoking questions.A median split was used to dichotomize both argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness into the two categories of high and low. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the first three hypotheses which made predictions about compliance-gaining strategy use on the basis of the agent's argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness levels. None of the ANOVAs produced significance between high and low argumentativeness. However, there was significance between high and low verbal aggressives. Specifically, high verbal aggressives reported greater use of a variety of compliance-gaining strategies than did low verbal aggressives.The second set of hypotheses made predictions about compliance-gaining strategy use on the basis of the agent's and target's gender. A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and univariate analyses were used to test these hypotheses. Males reported greater use of the explanation, direct request, and threat strategies when the target was of the same sex than did females. When the target was of the opposite sex, males reported more use of the threat strategy than did females. An interaction was found with threat. Both men and women reported using the threat strategy more when the target was male.Some of these findings were contradictory to previous research. Sprowl (1984) did not find a distinction between compliance-gaining strategies on the basis of target gender. Further research should examine the effects of agent and target gender on compliance-gaining usage. Additionally, high verbal aggressives reported using positive strategies. Infante and Rancer (1982) described verbal aggressiveness as a negative phenomena. Hence, future research needs to explore the potential positive traits of verbally aggressive individuals.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Speech Communication
dc.format.extent viii, 57 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Passive smoking. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Aggressiveness. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Compliance. en_US
dc.title The influence of nonsmokers' argumentativeness and verbal aggressiveness on compliance-gaining message selection in a smoking situation en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/834139 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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