An empirical examination of the zone of optimal functioning theory

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dc.contributor.advisor Weeks, Douglas L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Scallen, Stephen en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:36:01Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:36:01Z
dc.date.created 1992 en_US
dc.date.issued 1992
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1992 .S33 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184403
dc.description.abstract This study examined Hanin's (1980) zone of optimal functioning (ZOF) theory. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether being in or out of a ZOF could be used to predict performance of 19 female and 16 male varsity college swimmers. Determining ZOFs required a two part strategy. In part one, subjects retrospectively revealed optimal anxiety using the SAI and CSAI-2 anxiety inventories. Standard deviations from this portion of the study were used to determine the size of individual ZOFs. Each swimmer was assigned SAI, cognitive, somatic, and selfconfidence ZOFs. In part two, swimmers rated level of anxiety prior to competition. Pre-competition anxiety scores were compared to individual ZOFs to determine if swimmers were within or outside their ZOFs prior to performance. A performance score of 1 was assigned to swimmers whose competition time was better than their mean time for previous competition, while a score of 0 was assigned to those swimmers whose performance time was worsethan their mean time for previous competition. Tetrachoric correlations were computed to determine the magnitude of relationship between location about ZOF and subsequent performance score. Results indicated that being within SAI and somatic ZOFs were related to above average performance for male swimmers. A somatic-cognitive interaction was also significant for male swimmers. No significant relationships were identified for female swimmers possibly due to questionable reliability and validity of anxiety responses for females. It was concluded that data for male swimmers supported ZOF theory.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent vii, 95 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Swimming -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Anxiety. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Sports -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.title An empirical examination of the zone of optimal functioning theory en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/834513 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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