Counterfactual thinking and locus of control

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dc.contributor.advisor Kite, Mary E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Eck, James C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:36:43Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:36:43Z
dc.date.created 1994 en_US
dc.date.issued 1994
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1994 .E2 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184990
dc.description.abstract Counterfactual thinking is the tendency to view events that can easily be imagined otherwise as events that ought not to have been (Miller & Turnbull, 1990). Thirty-six male and sixty-five female subjects from introductory psychology courses completed a counterfactual thinking questionnaire and two personality measures assessing locus of control (Rotter Locus of Control Scale) and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory). Results supported the hypothesis that people are more likely to generate counterfactual thoughts when their actions are perceived as easily mutable or when an event is easily imagined otherwise. Results also indicated that women were more likely to mutate events than were men. Finally, participants with high self-esteem were more likely to mutate events than were participants with low self-esteem. Results provided no evidence for a relationship between counterfactual thinking and locus of control. Factors that might have reduced the impact of the individual difference variables are considered.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Psychological Science
dc.format.extent vi, 57 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Counterfactuals (Logic) -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Causation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Possibility. en_US
dc.title Counterfactual thinking and locus of control en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/897521 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5330]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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