The effects of stroke rate and stroke length on upper quadrant stroke patterns in competitive swimming

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dc.contributor.advisor Gehlsen, Gale M. en_US
dc.contributor.author Upshaw, Kris en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:37:04Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:37:04Z
dc.date.created 1995 en_US
dc.date.issued 1995
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1995 .U6 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/185271
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to describe women collegiate swimmers' armstroke sequence at selected velocities. In addition, this study was designed to determine the timing angle during the course of a stroke cycle. Seven members of the Ball State University Women's Swim Team were asked to participate in this study. The test consisted of the subject swimming approximately fifteen meters freestyle (front crawl) at stroke rates of 24, 30, 40, 48, 60 strokes per minute. The subjects attempted three trials at each stroke rate, on a continuum from slow to fast. The following parameters were determined from video analysis: stroke length (SL), velocity (m/s), time of one complete stroke cycle (SCT), timing between the arm cycles (RAE), recovery arm entry as a percentage of SCT (RAE%) and the timing angle. A correlation between the timing angle and V of r = 0.48 was found to be significant at the 0.05 level. A correlation between the SCT and the timing angle of r = -0.62 was found to be significant at the 0.05 level. A correlation of r = -0.43 between SL and the timing angle of less than 90 degrees is believed to benefit theangle was found to be significant at the 0.05 level. This indicates that as the swimmers' SCT decreased, the timing angle increased. And, as the swimmers' SL decreased the timing angle increased. It appears that timing angles increase with increasing V. The mean timing angle for ninety trials was 66.03 degrees with a SD of 17.68. This study indicates that women collegiate swimmers use a timing angle of less than 90 degrees. A timing swimmers' body position, balance and SL.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent vii, 62 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Swimming -- Crawl stroke -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Human locomotion. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Swimming for women. en_US
dc.title The effects of stroke rate and stroke length on upper quadrant stroke patterns in competitive swimming en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/958784 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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