A study to determine the effect of the use of hypermedia and graphics upon recall and retention of news stories in on-line newspapers

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dc.contributor.advisor Popovich, Mark N. en_US
dc.contributor.author Randolph, Gary en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:37:29Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:37:29Z
dc.date.created 1996 en_US
dc.date.issued 1996
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1996 .R37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/185606
dc.description.abstract More and more news organizations are publishing on-line news via the World Wide Web. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of hypermedia and graphics in online news upon immediate recall and longer-term retention.Ninety-eight subjects read one of four versions of a news story presented through a World Wide Web browser. The four versions tested the story with and without the use of graphics and with and without the use of hypermedia in a 2x2 design. Subjects were tested with a 15-question fill-inthe-blank quiz immediately and after one week.Analysis of variance found no significant effectsthe use of graphics or hypermedia or the interaction of the two upon immediate recall. However, a significant effect for the use of graphics was found for retention after one week.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Journalism
dc.format.extent iii, 65 leaves : col. ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Electronic newspapers. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading comprehension. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading, Psychology of. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Interactive multimedia -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Memory. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Recollection (Psychology) en_US
dc.title A study to determine the effect of the use of hypermedia and graphics upon recall and retention of news stories in on-line newspapers en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1033645 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5330]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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