The relationship between students' cognitive styles and their proficiency in English as a second language

Cardinal Scholar

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Payne, Charles R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ahmed, Ahmed Khaled en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:37:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:37:32Z
dc.date.created 1996 en_US
dc.date.issued 1996
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1996 .A37 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/185645
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate aspects of cognitive styles in relationship to the academic orientation of Arab ESL students. More specifically, this study attempted to answer the following questions:1- What are the different cognitive styles Arab students use in their learning of English as a second language?2- To what degree do Arab students who possess different cognitive styles perform differently on the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency?3- Are students' academic majors related to their proficiency in English as a second language?The subjects of this study were 82 students representing 11 Arab countries enrolled in ESL programs in four American universities. The Inventory of Learning Processes (Schmeck, Ribich, & Ramanaiah, 1977), was used to measure the students' cognitive styles and the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency (MTELP) was used to measure their performance on English as a second language.Results of this study indicated that Arab students fall on a continuum of four different cognitive styles with Elaborative Processing being the most dominant cognitive style among Arab students (44% of students). Deep Processing and Fact Retention were the next two cognitive styles Arab students possessed (26%, 21 % of students respectively). Only 10% of students possessed the Study Methods cognitive style. There was no significant relationship between students' cognitive styles and their performance on English as a second language except for the weak positive relationship that existed between the cognitive style of Elaborative Processing and proficiency in English as a second language. It was also found that students' academic majors played a major role in their performance on MTELP. Literature majors performed significantly better than science majors in English as a second language.It was recommended that ESL instructors at American universities identify Arab students' cognitive styles by using ILP prior to their enrollment in ESL courses. It was also recommended that ESL instructors vary their teaching strategies and resources so that individual student's needs regarding cognitive style are met. Further research is needed to investigate the interaction between students' academic majors, their cognitive styles and their proficiency in English as a second language. It is also important to further explore the relationship between the Elaborative Processing scale and students' proficiency in English as a second language.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Secondary, Higher, and Foundations of Education
dc.format.extent v, 75 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English language -- Study and teaching -- Arabic speakers. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Students, Foreign -- Education -- United States. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Second language acquisition. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Cognitive styles. en_US
dc.title The relationship between students' cognitive styles and their proficiency in English as a second language en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1033643 en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Master's Theses [5330]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

Show simple item record

Search Cardinal Scholar


Browse

My Account