Isolated tree canopy effects on understory plant composition and soil characteristics in three black oak savanna sites of northern Indiana

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dc.contributor.advisor Eflin, James C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Fuller, Leslie A. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:38:09Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:38:09Z
dc.date.created 1998 en_US
dc.date.issued 1998
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 1998 .F85 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/186106
dc.description.abstract This study is an effort to provide new information on the effects of isolated tree canopies on understory vegetation composition and soil characteristics of northern Indiana black oak savannas. Temperate savannas in the United States have been greatly altered by human activities. Management of these areas is an important consideration for Midwest natural resource agencies. It is hypothesized that isolated trees within a savanna may alter the soil and plants around them, much in the same way that gaps in a forest canopy alter the plant composition and soil characteristics on the forest floor. In this study, isolated trees were selected in three northern Indiana black oak (Quercus velutina) savannas. Plots were located under the tree canopies and in adjacent open areas, in four directions from the tree stem. Populations of herbaceous plants were inventoried and the soil characteristics analyzed for both inside-canopy and outside-canopy plots. The environmental variables measured accounted for only about 20 percent of the variation in plant community between plots according to a Canonical Correspondence Analysis. Most of the variation in plant composition between plots was explained by pH, the amount of rain throughfall, and the thickness of the A horizon. It is clear that these black oak trees do alter the soil and plant composition around them. This information has implications for the long-term management of northern Indiana savannas.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management
dc.format.extent viii, 81 leaves : ill., maps ; 28 cm. + 1 map (col.) en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Savanna ecology -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Plant communities -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Black oak -- Indiana. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Soils -- Indiana. en_US
dc.title Isolated tree canopy effects on understory plant composition and soil characteristics in three black oak savanna sites of northern Indiana en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1115739 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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