Organizational publications editors : their use of information subsidies and agenda setting

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dc.contributor.advisor McDonald, Becky A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Huffman, Holly D. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-in en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:38:46Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:38:46Z
dc.date.created 1999 en_US
dc.date.issued 1999
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 1999 .H84 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/186613
dc.description.abstract This study was designed to identify correlates of success in Supported Employment(SE) programs for persons with psychiatric disabilities. Indiana policy-makers are seriously considering a managed care, or "capitated," system of payment to make SE provider programs more efficient economically. However, many agencies are concerned about providing services to more severely impaired individuals because of the potentially higher costs of serving these individuals. Two studies are included in this project. The goals of the first study were to identify SE consumer (clinical) characteristics that predict (1) successful outcomes, defined as whether the consumer achieves gainful work, and (2) program costs, defined as the amounts of SE service hours utilized by consumers who obtain work. In two large samples of SE consumers with serious mental illness, no clinical characteristics (e.g., diagnosis, rated functioning, hospitalization history) were associated with vocational outcome or service costs. The goal of the second study was to describe the types and amounts of services utilized by SE consumers who obtain work. Specific service categories associated with obtaining work were travel, training, and advocacy that was unrelated to the consumer's job. The implications of these findings are discussed in the framework of the debate over clinical versus empirical prediction. The need for a theoretical model of SE services that allows the use of predictive clinical and consumer driven services is also discussed.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Journalism
dc.format.extent vii, 75 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Periodical editors -- Decision making. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Business literature -- Publishing -- Political aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Employees' magazines, newsletters, etc. -- Publishing. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Periodicals -- Publishing -- Methodology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Business information services -- Use studies. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Information resources management -- Indiana. en_US
dc.title Organizational publications editors : their use of information subsidies and agenda setting en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1136713 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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