Clinical outcomes of multiple ice treatments on signs and symptoms of exercised-induced muscle damage

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dc.contributor.advisor Weidner, Thomas G. en_US
dc.contributor.author Girardin, Erika A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:38:53Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:38:53Z
dc.date.created 2000 en_US
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2000 .G57 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/186703
dc.description.abstract The objective of this study was to determine the effect of multiple ice treatments on the signs and symptoms of exercise induced muscle damage. Twenty-four women performed vigorous eccentric exercise of elbow flexors to induce muscle damage. Subjects were randomly assigned into one of three groups(control, experimental group 1, experimental group 2). Experimental groups 1 and 2 received two and six ice bag treatments respectively for two consecutive days post exercise-induced muscle damage. Dependent variables included pain perception, resting arm angle, bicep, forearm, and wrist circumferences, elbow range of motion, and plasma concentrations of creatine kinase. Baseline measurements were obtained on day one and were repeated every 24 hours post-exercise for five days. No significant differences were observed between groups. The results of this study indicate that ice bag treatments do not have any affect on signs/symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent 15 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ice -- Therapeutic use -- Evaluation. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Muscles -- Wounds and injuries -- Treatment. en_US
dc.title Clinical outcomes of multiple ice treatments on signs and symptoms of exercised-induced muscle damage en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1179132 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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