Predictive factors of the promotion of physical activity by Air Force squadron commanders

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dc.contributor.advisor Gobble, David C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Whelan, Dana L. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:39:14Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:39:14Z
dc.date.created 2001 en_US
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2001 .W49 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/186989
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of vitamin E supplementation on lipid peroxidation, muscle damage, muscle soreness and physical performance following repeated bouts of whole body resistance exercise. Eighteen active males were randomly assigned to receive either vitamin E (1200 IU per day) or placebo for 31 days. Following 21 days of supplementation, subjects engaged in 3 resistance exercise sessions, separated by 3 days rest (EX-1, EX-2 and EX-3 on days 22, 25 and 28, respectively). Plasma malondialdehyde concentrations did not peak until the morning prior to EX-3 in the vitamin E (VE) group (10.0 ± 0.6 µmol/L) and the day following EX3 in the placebo (P) group (9.6 ± 0.9 µmol/L), with no significant differences between groups. Creatine kinase activity was significantly elevated the day following EX-1 in both groups. The VE group had a near 2-fold greater CK peak as compared to the P group the day following EX-1 (404 ± 49 and 214 ± 60 U/L, respectively), but the two groups had similar CK values by day 31 (113 ± 35 and 107 ± 36 U/L, respectively). Muscle soreness was significantly increased for each group the day after EX-1 with no significant differences between groups.Furthermore, there were no significant differences between groups in muscle strength, power or endurance. The results of the present study do not indicate any positive effect of vitamin E supplementation against lipid peroxidation, muscle damage or muscle soreness as a result of repeated days of resistance exercise. In addition, vitamin E did not have an effect on muscular performance.
dc.description.sponsorship Fisher Institute for Wellness and Gerontology
dc.format.extent v, 93 leaves : chart, facsims. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Exercise -- Physiological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Physical education and training, Military. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Exercise -- Public opinion. en_US
dc.subject.other United States. Air Force -- Physical training. en_US
dc.subject.other United States. Air Force -- Officers -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.title Predictive factors of the promotion of physical activity by Air Force squadron commanders en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1221286 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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