The effect of structured teambuilding on athlete satisfaction in NCAA Division III men's and women's soccer players

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dc.contributor.advisor King, Roch A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Blessing, Aaron C. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:40:13Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:40:13Z
dc.date.created 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2004 .B59 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/187755
dc.description.abstract Previous research has explored the benefits of structured teambuilding interventions in the team sport environment (Voight & Callaghan, 2001). Structured teambuilding has a positive effect on cohesion, and the link between cohesiveness and successful athletic performance has been well documented (Carron, Colman, Wheeler, & Stevens, 2002), but little research has been carried out in terms of student-athlete enjoyment of their athletic experience based on the incorporation of structured teambuilding as part of the training environment. This study was designed to examine the effect of structured teambuilding on athlete satisfaction in NCAA Division III men's and women's soccer. One hundred and eleven student-athletes from six NCAA Division III soccer teams participated. Sixty-five student-athletes played for teams that used structured teambuilding (STB). Forty-six student-athletes played for teams that did not use structured teambuilding (NSTB). Students indicated average playing time per game and completed the Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire (ASQ) (Riemer & Chelladurai, 1998) at the conclusion of his or her regular season, but prior to any post-season competition. A 2 (use of team building) x 3 (playing status) ANOVA revealed significant main effects for use of team building, F(1, 105) = 9.34,p < .003, and playing status, F(2, 105) = 9.10, p = < .001. Post-hoc analysis revealed significant differences in 8 of the 15 subscales of the ASQ: individual performance, ability utilization, personal treatment, training and instruction, team social contribution, and personal dedication. STB studentathletes recorded significantly higher satisfaction when compared with their NSTB counterparts. Implications for the use of structured teambuilding as a tool for team development, drawing particular attention to the satisfaction of players, are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent viii, 82 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Sports teams -- Psychological aspects. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Soccer players -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College athletes -- Attitudes. en_US
dc.title The effect of structured teambuilding on athlete satisfaction in NCAA Division III men's and women's soccer players en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1293517 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5454]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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