The effect of game location on self-efficacy and assertive play in women's collegiate soccer

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dc.contributor.advisor King, Roch A. en_US
dc.contributor.author Pigozzo, Julie M. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:40:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:40:15Z
dc.date.created 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2004 .P54 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/187779
dc.description.abstract Several studies conducted on home advantage in sport have focused on game location and performance outcome. The purpose of this study was to examine three components of home advantage, such as the effect that game location has on self-efficacy, a critical psychological state, and assertive play, a critical behavioral state. Participants (N = 21) from one mid-sized, midwest, Division I soccer program completed the Modified State Sport-Confidence Inventory (MSSCI) prior to six home conference games and six away conference games. In addition, all 12-conference games were observed and coded according to four assertive behaviors of soccer players. Data were analyzed using a permutation test and Spearman's Rho with a level of significance set at .05. Results indicated there was no significant difference in self-efficacy between home and away games and no significant difference in assertive play between home and away games. No significance relationship was found for self-efficacy and assertive play. Possible limitations along with recommendations for the future are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education
dc.format.extent vi, 68 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Soccer matches. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Women soccer players -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh College athletes -- Psychology. en_US
dc.title The effect of game location on self-efficacy and assertive play in women's collegiate soccer en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1306856 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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