Methods for determining power output and factors affecting the optimal load during free-standing jump squats

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dc.contributor.advisor Dugan, Eric L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Newell, Philip B. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:40:46Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:40:46Z
dc.date.created 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier LD2489.Z78 2005 .N49 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/188040
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this thesis was to determine the validity of an linear position transducer / force platform method as compared to a 2D video analysis / force platform method for determining power output during free-standing jump squats, and to examine the effects of strength level and sport background on the optimal load for power output. The results showed that the LPT method was not suitable for measuring power output during free-standing jump squats. In addition, the optimal load range was determined for the VA method to occur between 10% and 20% of a predicted 1RM squat. Strength level did not have a significant affect on the optimal load, however, there were differences in strength and power output by sport. It is recommended that future research examine the specific limitations of an LPT for measuring un-constrained movements, as well as the effects of athletic and training background on the optimal load.
dc.description.sponsorship School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science
dc.format.extent ix, 75 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Jumping. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Weight lifting. en_US
dc.title Methods for determining power output and factors affecting the optimal load during free-standing jump squats en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.S.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1315174 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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