A study of cult television, Buffy the vampire slayer, and the uses and gratifications theory

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dc.contributor.advisor Filak, Vincent F. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rodeheffer, Marielle D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-03T19:41:24Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-03T19:41:24Z
dc.date.created 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier LD2489.Z72 2007 .R63 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/188319
dc.description.abstract This study builds on the Uses and Gratifications body of knowledge as applies to motivations surrounding television use, specifically the cult television program Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Through the distribution of online survey it was found that respondents who read and/or wrote fanfiction were more likely to engage in the variable of parasocail relationships. One hypothesis was disregarded due to the invalidity of the variable. Through two research questions it was found that the variable of affinity was indicative of a viewer's involvement with the show. The second research question found only two marginally significant variables, personal identity and realism, with regard to the number of years one had been a fan of the show. Age was found to be significant in all the variables and was accounted for.
dc.description.sponsorship Department of Journalism
dc.format.extent v, 80 leaves ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Horror television programs -- History and criticism. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Fantasy television programs -- History and criticism. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Television viewers -- Psychology. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Cult television programs.
dc.subject.other Buffy, the vampire slayer (Television program) en_US
dc.title A study of cult television, Buffy the vampire slayer, and the uses and gratifications theory en_US
dc.description.degree Thesis (M.A.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1379437 en_US


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  • Master's Theses [5510]
    Master's theses submitted to the Graduate School by Ball State University master's degree candidates in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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