The person behind the disease : managing the psychosocial aspects of multiple sclerosis : an honors thesis [(HONRS 499)]

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dc.contributor.advisor Wieseke, Ann W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Anthony, Cassandra R. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-06T18:23:56Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-06T18:23:56Z
dc.date.created 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.other A-306 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/189300
dc.description.abstract Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable and potentially debilitating neurological disease that may result in physical, psychological, and emotional decline. The psychosocial aspects of managing the care of people with multiple sclerosis are as important as managing the actual disease process. Therefore, there is a need to understand how multiple sclerosis affects the people behind the disease. Research reveals that stress may act as a stimulus/response to MS, therefore effective coping skills are necessary. People with MS and their families cope with major changes in lifestyle and roles while moving through the grieving process. Health care providers act as advocates for patients and families facing this disease and developing effective coping strategies. Through understanding the psychosocial impact of MS, I can apply the principles to my nursing practice and help my mother and family cope with MS. I will examine the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis, stress as a stimulus/response with MS, and how the disease affects and is managed by patients, families, and healthcare providers.
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.format.extent 28 leaves ; 30 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing. en_US
dc.title The person behind the disease : managing the psychosocial aspects of multiple sclerosis : an honors thesis [(HONRS 499)] en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1338446 en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5615]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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