Food and humanity : the cultural and historical significance of food for the ancient Romans to the Italian-American immigrants : honors thesis [(HONRS 499)]

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dc.contributor.author Kelley, Erin K. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-06T19:03:46Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-06T19:03:46Z
dc.date.created 1997 en_US
dc.date.issued 1997
dc.identifier.other A-193 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/191107
dc.description.abstract The sole view of food only serving humans with nutritional needs underestimates and disregards the symbolic and cultural meanings of food. Looked at in broader context, humans live not just off of food but also through it. Food is used to define and unite people in any given culture. In turn, humans use food to transmit and keep alive their heritage. Food thus becomes an archetype to which all humans have a connection because all humans have contact with food and use it for more than just sustenance. There might be diversity between people and the actual foods they eat, but the constant remains the same -- food as an expression of humanity. This paper attempts to illustrate this point by tracing the "food history" of ancient Rome through the immigration of Italians to America at the turn of the 19th century.
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.format.extent 1 v. ; 28 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh History. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ball State University. Honors College -- Theses (B.?) -- 1997. en_US
dc.title Food and humanity : the cultural and historical significance of food for the ancient Romans to the Italian-American immigrants : honors thesis [(HONRS 499)] en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1243345 en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5615]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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