Chaucer's view of fourteenth century English chivalry as seen through The Canterbury tales and through the contemporary socio-political viewpoint of the Hundred Years War : an honors thesis (HONRS 499)

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dc.contributor.advisor Hozeski, Bruce en_US
dc.contributor.author Walls, Gail L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-06T19:29:57Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-06T19:29:57Z
dc.date.created 1991 en_US
dc.date.issued 1991
dc.identifier.other A-125 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/193003
dc.description.abstract This thesis is a discussion of how Geoffrey Chaucer uses four of his Canterbury Tales to show how the Hundred Years War brought a decline to the chivalric values of fourteenth century England. This paper explains how Chaucer uses the public opinion of his day to describe the feelings of the war with France as an influence to the king. It will explain how Chaucer uses satire in the "Knight's Tale" to show how knighthood had become mercenary and had lost all of it chivalric flavor. He continues with the "Squire's Tale" to explain how the exotic East had influenced the young men hoping to become knights. Finally, this thesis will discuss how Chaucer makes a plea for peace with France through the "Tale of Sir Thopas" and through the "Tale of Melibee."
dc.description.sponsorship Honors College
dc.format.extent 36 leaves ; 29 cm. en_US
dc.source Virtual Press en_US
dc.subject.lcsh English. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Ball State University. Honors College -- Theses (B.?.) -- 1991. en_US
dc.title Chaucer's view of fourteenth century English chivalry as seen through The Canterbury tales and through the contemporary socio-political viewpoint of the Hundred Years War : an honors thesis (HONRS 499) en_US
dc.type Undergraduate senior honors thesis
dc.description.degree Thesis (B.?.)
dc.identifier.cardcat-url http://liblink.bsu.edu/catkey/1246103 en_US


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  • Undergraduate Honors Theses [5928]
    Honors theses submitted to the Honors College by Ball State University undergraduate students in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.

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