Elements of successful management support systems for reading programs as perceived by principals and reading personnel in selected Indiana school corporations

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Authors
Edwards, Judith Ann
Advisor
Strom, Merle T. (Merle Thomas), 1916-
Issue Date
1982
Keyword
Degree
Thesis (D. Ed.)
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Abstract

The purpose of the study was to compare perceived judgments of building principals and reading teachers relative to identified facets of reading program organization and operation. Response data were received from 216 principals and 134 reading personnel. The chi-square statistic was used to compare reported perceptions of principals and reading personnel. The .01 level was used to indicate the attainment of statistical significance.Findings1. No statistically significant differences were found to exist between reported perceptions of principals and reading personnel relative to cruciality of seventeen of twenty statements.2. A statistically significant difference was found to exist between reported perceptions of principals and reading personnel relative to the cruciality of three statements.3. No statistically significant differences were found to exist between reported perceptions of principals and reading personnel relative to occurrence for one of twenty statements.4. A statistically significant difference was found to exist between reported perceptions of principals and reading personnel relative to occurrence for nineteen of the occurrence statements.5. Sixty percent or more of participating principals and reading personnel perceived all twenty items to be of "moderate" or "great" cruciality.6. Sixty percent or more of participating principals and reading personnel perceived seven items to be of "moderate" or "great" occurrence.7. Nine items were identified by 60 percent or more of participating principals as being of "moderate" or "great" occurrence.8. Fifty percent or more of reading personnel reported "no" or a "limited" degree of occurrence for nine of the twenty statements. Fifty percent of participating principals reported occurrence to be a "moderate" or "great" degree for each of the same nine items.Conclusions1. Administrative support is essential to the success of building level reading programs.2. Administrators should have a knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the elements of an effective reading program.3. Planned and regularly offered in-service programs for experienced staff and administrators relative to reading programs is essential.4. Administrators should delegate distracting tasks.5. Principals, teachers, and reading personnel need to improve communication.6. Principals need to survey staff at periodic intervals to provide for a school-wide evaluation of the reading program.