A study of the leadership role of the secondary science teacher as this role relates to the science program

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Authors
Snider, Joseph Lee, 1935-
Advisor
Nisbet, Jerry J.
Issue Date
1970
Keyword
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Thesis (D. Ed.)
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate and report on aspects of the leadership role of the secondary science teacher as interpreted by the science teachers, principals, and supervisors. The opinionnaire developed and used in this study was designed to elicit information regarding the leadership role of the secondary school science teacher as this role relates to the science program.The study population included 971 Indiana and responded to the statements of the opinionnaire. The opinionnaire was designed to elicit information about current practices and future concepts about the role of the science teacher, and the relation of this role to effective science leadership. An opinionnaire was mailed to each individual in the study population with necessary directions and information for the respondent, and a return envelope for his convenience.The study populations' responses to the various opinionnaire statements were transferred to optical Ohio science teachers, principals, and supervisors who scanner forms for computer processing. The data were treated by a cross correlation technique which was presented in terms of the number and percentage of respondents' reactions, and by a chi-square value to determine the significance of each statement.Five null hypotheses were tested in order to examine the relationships between the observed results and the expected results on the hypothesis of equal probability of the responses of science teachers, principals, and supervisors. The major findings were reported for each of the following areas of concern.The current role of science teachers as leaders in science.The current role of science teachers in an effective science program.The future role of science teachers as leaders in an ideal science department.The extent of unity present in the total science programs of representative school systems.Competencies needed for the development of science teachers.From this investigation a generalization can be made that the principals and supervisors are more positive about the contributions of science teachers as leaders in science education than are science teachers themselves.The majority of the three groups of the study population believe that the main reason the science teachers participate in activities conducted or organized by the science department is for personal satisfaction of helping others and not for leadership opportunities. They feel that having knowledge and understanding of materials and apparatus appropriate for teaching science is one of the most important current roles of the science teacher in an effective science program. The science teachers believe that the greatest obstacle that should be overcome to enable the science department to become more successful is the excessive teacher load; while inadequate budget for the science department is held as the greatest obstacle to be overcome by both the principals and the supervisors.The opinions of the study population concerning the leadership, goals, and organization of the science department were conflicting. The unified theme for the science teacher is that leadership, goals, and organization are the responsibility of each individual teacher. The principals generally agree that leadership, goals, and organization are the responsibility of the science teachers of each building; while the supervisors generally agree that leadership, goals, and organization are the responsibility of a central planning committee of science teachers from grades K through 12.