The relationship between the Affective Facial Recognition Test and the Facial Recognition Test with a group of left and right CVA patients

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Authors
Schmidt, Edward E.
Advisor
Hayes, Robert E.
Issue Date
1984
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Thesis (Ph. D.)
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the Affective Facial Recognition Test (AFRT) and Facial Recognition Test (FRT) with a group of right and left hemisphere CVA patients and controls. In addition, the differences in abilities of right and left hemisphere CVA patients and controls to perform on these two tests was explored. The four null hypotheses were: (a) There will be no significant differences between right and left hemisphere damaged patients and controls on the AFRT, (b) There will be no significant differences between right and left hemisphere damaged patients and controls on the FRT, (c) There will be no significant relationship between the AFRT and FRT with right hemisphere damaged patients, and (d) There will be no significant relationship between the AFRT and FRT with left hemisphere damaged patients. Hypotheses one and two were statistically analyzed by using a One-Way Analysis of Variance and three and four by a Pearson Product Moment Correlation.Experimental group subjects were 16 right and 16 left hemisphere CVA volunteer patients obtained from Community Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana. The control group was composed of 16 non-neurologically impaired subjects from the Muncie, Indiana area. All subjects were equated with respects to age, education, and post-injury. The subjects were randomly administered the AFRT, FRT, and Comprehension subtest of the WAIS-R. The Comprehension subtest was used as a screening device to insure that the patients understood what was expected of them during the testing. The testing, data analysis, and interpretation was completed between May, 1982 and February, 1984.All four hypotheses were rejected. Right and left hemisphere CVA patients and controls significantly differed in performance on the AFRT and FRT (r<.01). In short, right and left hemisphere CVA's were significantly impaired on the AFRT and FRT when compared with the controls. However, both experimental groups exhibited equal impairment on the two tests. This suggests that neither affective facial recognition nor facial recognition is hemispherically lateralized. Also, a higher relationship (r=.79) was found between the AFRT and FRT with right hemisphere patients as opposed to left (r=.65). This appears to indicate that both tests are measuring similar neurological functions and that the inability to match unfamiliar faces and affective faces may not be two separate disorders.