The effect of high and low anxiety on level of motivation, length of stay in treatment, and intrapsychic focus of attention in Veterans Administration drug-abuse patients

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Authors
Clansy, Pauline Amos
Advisor
Hayes, Robert E.
Issue Date
1985
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Thesis (D. Ed.)
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of high and low anxiety on motivation for treatment, length of stay in treatment, and intrapsychic focus of attention in Veterans Administration drug-abuse patients. The dependent variables were measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), Reasons For Seeking Treatment Inventory (RFST), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Psychopathic State Inventory (PSI), and the total number of days each subject participated in the treatment program. The major hypothesis was stated in the null form.The PSI and the STAI were used to measure motivation for seeking treatment. The MMPI and the RFST were used to measure intrapsychic focus of attention.On admission and on day 60, the subjects in the High Stress Treatment Group and the subjects in the Low Stress Treatment Group were not found to he significantly different, as measured by the STAI and the PSI, and intrapsychic focus of attention, as measured by the MMPI and the RFST.This study revealed that the subjects in the High Stress Treatment Group developed a higher level of motivation than the subjects in the Low Stress Treatment Group. The Subjects in the High Stress Treatment Group stayed in treatment longer than the subjects in the Low Stress Treatment Group. Subjects in the High Stress Treatment Group focused more on intrapsychic issues than subjects in the Low Stress Treatment Group.