Buffer capacity of blood and muscle in untrained, sprint trained and endurance trained man

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Authors
Sharp, Rick L.
Advisor
Costill, David L.
Issue Date
1983
Keyword
Degree
Thesis (Ph. D.)
Department
Other Identifiers
Abstract

This series of experiments was designed to examine various relationships between physical training and acid-base regulation in blood and muscle of man. The specific purposes of these studies were to 1) determine if the buffer capacity of blood differs between endurance trained and untrained males, 2) examine the effects of eight weeks of sprint training on the buffer capacity of blood and muscle, and 3) determine if a difference exists in the buffer capacity of blood and muscle between endurance trained and sprint trained males. Buffer capacity of blood, measured with an exercise titration of blood, was found to be not different between untrained and either sprint trained or endurance trained subjects. The buffer capacity of muscle, measured by observing the change in muscle pH created by known changes in muscle lactate, was found to be significantly greater in sprint trained subjects than both untrained and endurance trained subjects. Muscle buffer capacity was not different between untrained and endurance trained subjects. It was concluded that buffer capacity is atrainable entity but that its improvement is localized within muscle and is specific to the type of training employed.